50 years ago in microscopy

A biochemist describes an electron microscopy technique that allowed him to visualize condensing DNA

Eduard Kellenberger
Jan 21, 2008
Editor's note: Citation Classics Commentaries were written by the authors of studies that were some of the most highly cited papers between 1961 and 1975. The essays were originally published between 1977 and 1993 in Current Contents, a publication of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), now Thomson Scientific. (ISI was founded by Eugene Garfield, also the founder of The Scientist.) In this essay, published in 1978, a biochemist and microscopist describes his 1958 paper describing a new technique for preparing thin sections for the electron microscope.The study, led by Eduard Kellenberger, then at the University of Geneva, made an impact more for its advancements of microscopy than for its biological findings regarding DNA. In the past, researchers had fixed tissue for electron microscopy with a type of plastic called methacrylate, which could create artifacts in the tissue, explained Bruno Strasser, a science historian at Yale. Kellenberger's study defined a...
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J. Biophys. Biochem. Cytol.

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