Behavior brief

A round up of recent discoveries in behavior research

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef (an unusual nickname for Jennifer) got her master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses. After four years of diving off the Gulf...

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Feb 28, 2011
Gluttonous spiders
Black widow spider
Image: Wikimedia commons, Vesper
Female black widow spiders can become wasteful killers when food is plentiful, attacking prey even when they're not hungry, an unusual phenomenon in the animal kingdom. "They're sort of like humans, when they're around a lot of food they become lazy and wasteful," Arizona State University biologist J. Chadwick Johnson linkurl:told Wired Science.;http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/02/black-widow-gluttony/ "They'll kill food they don't need, and leave some of it uneaten." Female spiders may display this gluttonous behavior to attract mates -- a well-fed female is less likely to eat her partner once they've finished copulating.The stress of monogamyMonogamy has its benefits -- a bonded pair can provide more consistent parental care and such a relationship reduces the likelihood of extra-pair mating. But for those who don't pair up early, finding a partner can be a stressful affair, and once they settle for Mr....
Proceedings of the Royal Society BSwimming through sandWired ScienceFlowers' mammal lure exposed Cytinus visseriThe body language of frogs
Red-eyed tree frog
Image: Wikimedia commons, Natox
Crazy ants, crazy breeding Proceedings of the Royal Society BMore women, fewer kids
Original image title: A Mormon "Saint" and wives
Image: Wikimedia commons, DcoetzeeBot
thEvolution and Human BehaviorCats are good nutritionists



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