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Controlling chaos

Artist Lori Nix builds disasters in miniature

Lena Groeger
A tornado has scrambled the contents of a small town square, leaving upturned automobiles, lopsided telephone poles and a confused cow planted smack in the middle of very unfamiliar patch of grass.Cracked yellow instrument panels, rusty dials and broken gauges are all that remain of a nuclear power plant control room, devoid of human presence in the aftermath of a meltdown.
California Forest Fire, 2002
Image courtesy of Lori Nix
A glowing orange fire blazes through jagged black trees, rushing in a fury towards a tiny aluminum camper, its inhabitants ignorant of the impending danger. No, these bizarre scenarios are not plucked from obscure science fiction novels, surrealist dystopias or old folk tales; they are grounded quite solidly in the real world. Except that world is three feet tall. The scenes are dollhouse-sized dioramas, meticulously created and photographed by artist Lori Nix.While her work often coincides with current...
exhibitedAccidentally Kansas
Control Room, 2010
Image courtesy of Lori Nix
Mall, 2010
Image courtesy of Lori Nix
The CityThis article is provided by Scienceline, a project of New York University's Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program.



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