Fraud: who is responsible?

Recent cases remind us that research misconduct is a persistent threat, says a journal editor

Jeffrey D. Blaustein
Apr 28, 2010
__Editor's Note -- The Office of Research Integrity (ORI) recently penalized two endocrinology researchers for fraud, including University of Indiana grad student linkurl:Emily Horvath;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/57297/ and linkurl:Boris Cheskis,;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/57380/ a former Wyeth scientist. Cheskis and his coauthors retracted two publications (including one that was highly cited), and two publications that Horvath co-authored are in the process of being retracted, including one published by linkurl:__Endocrinology__.;http://endo.endojournals.org/ Jeffrey Blaustein, Editor-in-Chief of __Endocrinology__, has written the following opinion about scientific fraud, but notes that "the allegations that led to action by the ORI did not come from the editors or the Editor-in-Chief of __Endocrinology__, nor by the reviewers or readers of the journal."__
__Jeffrey D. Blaustein__
Who is responsible for the fraudulent data making its way into publication? The Office of Research Integrity (ORI) recently reported two misconduct cases in which scientists committed fraud in research grant applications, and in one case, in papers published in...




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