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Geron CEO: Q&A

Thomas Okarma discusses the long and controversial path to harnessing the power of human embryonic stem cells

Elie Dolgin
On the afternoon of Wednesday, January 21, Geron Corp.'s president and CEO Thomas Okarma received a phone call from the US Food and Drug Administration, notifying
him that Geron's 21,000-odd page investigational new drug (IND) application for the first-ever Phase 1 human trial of a medical treatment derived from human embryonic stem cells had been linkurl:approved.;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55353/ The decision, which lifted a hold on the trial in place since May of 2008, has been greeted by linkurl:enthusiasm;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55354/ from industry and patient advocates.Okarma spoke with __The Scientist__ today (January 26) about the decision, rumors over the political timing of the announcement, and when the much-anticipated trial is set to begin. __**The Scientist**__: How does it feel to finally be entering the clinic with a stem-cell treatment for spinal cord injuries?__**Thomas Okarma**__: It is probably my greatest professional accomplishment. It is something that I and the people that I work with have been...
Image: Julie Jacobson, Associated Press

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