Groups unite to oppose UK hybrid ban

An unprecedented number of medical research charities join politicians and scientists calling for the use of enucleated animal eggs in human stem cell research

Stephen Pincock
Apr 4, 2007
British politicians and more than two hundred medical research charities and patient groups have today (April 5) united to support British scientists in opposition to a government plan that could forbid the use of enucleated animal eggs to produce human stem cells for research.The House of Commons Science and Technology Select Committee published a report criticizing the proposed ban, which could be included in upcoming draft legislation in May."Our report is really quite explicit that the research into cytoplasmic hybrid embryos should go ahead now ... and that the proposed legislation that comes into the House in May should be permissive," the Committee chair Phil Willis told The Scientist.A coalition of 223 research charities and patient groups, some of which fund research, also added their voices to the debate, sending a letter to Prime Minister Tony Blair saying that the research was needed to overcome a shortage of human...

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