ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

It's Life Sciences, Mr. Bond

The 007 films are jam-packed with action, suspense and some truly unbelievable biological science, according to the authors of a new book on Bond

Lois H. Gresh and Robert Weinberg
Moviegoers' expectations are rising in anticipation of the mid-November release of the latest James Bond epic, Casino Royale, and life scientists can only hope that maybe this time, the producers will finally get things right. Unfortunately, history doesn't bode well: in all of the previous 20 Bond adventures, the laws of biology and chemistry were routinely ignored. The flawed science in the Bond films is responsible for some pervasive myths in modern society. Take Goldfinger, for example, perhaps the most popular Bond film ever made and one of the most influential movies of its time. In one of the film's most memorable scenes, our hero wakes up to find his companion, the beautiful Jill Masterson, dead, her barely clothed body completely covered with gold paint. She died, we are informed by Bond, because the paint clogged her pores and her skin couldn't breathe. The story soon spread from...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT