News from AAAS

Some highlights from the annual AAAS conference, held in Washington, DC, this past weekend

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef (an unusual nickname for Jennifer) got her master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses. After four years of diving off the Gulf...

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Feb 20, 2011
This year's American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) conference gathered researchers, educators, and policy makers from around the world to present on topics ranging from the state of US science to behavioral research in monkeys to possible new alternative fuel sources. Below are some highlights from the past weekend of talks and symposia.US losing lead in science?The United States will lose its spot as the dominant leader in science and technology research as more countries increase their scientific output, according to Penn State researcher linkurl:Caroline Wagner,;http://sia.psu.edu/faculty/wagner who presented her findings on Friday (February 18). The proportion of papers authored by US researchers, Wagner repoorted, dropped by 20 percent from 1996 to 2008. Not surprisingly, China is one of the biggest emerging players in the scientific community. The country is already publishing more papers in natural science and engineering, and some estimate that it will be more...
Monkey uncertainty
Image: Wikimedia commons, Mieciu K2
BBC NewsConstructing plant-inspired movementAsthma-parasite resistance linkSchistosoma mansoniS. mansoniPhotosynthesizing for fuel



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