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More iPS mutation worries, the benefits of invasive species, Hwang evacuated from Libya

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

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Mar 2, 2011
Today's news includes more mutations found in iPS cell lines, singing the praises of invasive species, studies highlight the need for women and children in drug development and clinical trials, another victory for the company selling a method for reconstructing breast tissue using a patient's own stem cells, and a disgraced South Korean stem cell researcher is evacuated from Libya.
More bad news for iPS cellsTwo studies published online in __Nature__ yesterday report that adult cells reprogrammed to behave like stem cells, so called induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS, contain more mutations than normal cells, making their use as therapeutic agents more worrisome and less likely. One linkurl:study;http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v471/n7336/full/nature09805.html found an average of six single base mutations in each of 22 iPS cell lines that were transformed using a variety of methods. The other linkurl:paper;http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v471/n7336/full/nature09871.html reported that iPS cell lines had more copy number variations -- small deletions or...
When invasives ain't so badpaper__Wired__Clinical research ignores women and childrenStem cell-built breasts pass another testHwang hanging with Libyan scientists?__The Korea Herald__



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