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Nobel nosh

How you, too, can dine like a laureate

Stephen Pincock
In 1901, linkurl:Emil von Behring;http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1901/behring-bio.html ate brill garnished with shellfish in a creamy sauce; 61 years later, linkurl:Watson, Crick and Wilkins;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/13459/ celebrated with roast linkurl:chicken;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53190/ and foie gras drizzled with Madeira sauce. And in 1997, linkurl:Stanley Prusiner;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/22653/ tucked into breast of squab with mushrooms, potatoes and onions in a sweet and sour sauce with raspberry vinegar.
On December 10 each year, the linkurl:Stockholm;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/7276/ City Hall plays host to a banquet in honor of that year's linkurl:Nobel Laureates,;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/17255/ when 1300 guests, 200 synchronized wait-staff, 10,000 flowers and mounds of gold-rimmed flatware fill the cavernous "blue" hall (which is in fact the color of red bricks).Prize-winners and dignitaries aside, landing a seat at one of the banquet's 65 tables is nigh impossible. For the rest of us, the only chance to savor a taste of the Nobel experience is to head for the "Stadshuskällaren" linkurl:restaurant,;http://www.profilrestauranger.se/eng/rest/stadshus/info_more.php in the city hall's cellar.Given enough notice...

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