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Pass the comics -- No, the science ones

Traditionally fodder for young boys and Sunday papers, comics become a tool for communicating the cartoonish side of science

Edyta Zielinska
"In the body...In the lungs...A dendritic cell awaits the inevitable..." A blond woman in a snug red top and blue shorts opens her eyes. "Intruder alert!" Her hands grabs a green reptilian creature, and she promptly fells him with a SMACK and witty one-liner. Two men with white beards rush to her side. "Beta, what's happening?" one asks. "We've got visitors, Alpha-1," she replies.
The woman is interferon beta, who was joined by alphas 1 and 13. They are the army that protects the body from outside invaders, this time a tentacled, green influenza viral peptide. The drama is captured on the pages of a new comic book called "Interferon Force," published by PBL Interferon Source, a Piscataway, NJ- based biotech that sells - not surprisingly -interferon products.It's a strange scene to play out on the pages of a comic book, to say the least. Jaleel Shujath, who edited...

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