Salmon parents, trout offspring

Surrogate broodstock technique could help revive endangered fish species

Melissa Lee Phillips
Sep 12, 2007
Researchers have developed a practical method of breeding endangered fish species, according to a paper in this week's Science. The authors report that transplanting reproductive cells from rainbow trout into sterile salmon surrogates led to the birth of healthy trout offspring."Here is a new way that you can breed and bring back an endangered species or an extinct species," said Yonathan Zohar of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute in Baltimore, who was not involved in the work. "It's absolutely feasible."In previous work, researchers at the Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology (TUMSAT) in Japan transplanted primordial germ cells from trout into male salmon. The salmon produced trout sperm and offspring, but two problems with the technique remained. First, only a small number of primordial germ cells could be isolated from the donor trout, making the process inefficient. Second, the salmon also produced their own sperm along with...

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