Six-legged soldiers

Insects have been converted into weapons of war and tools of terror for millennia. A new book asks: Are we ready for the next wave?

Jeffrey A. Lockwood
Oct 23, 2008
Adapted from the epilogue of linkurl:__Six-Legged Soldiers: Using Insects as Weapons of War__:;http://www.amazon.com/Six-Legged-Soldiers-Using-Insects-Weapons/dp/0195333055__Dusk descends on a sweltering linkurl:New Orleans.;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/23293/ A naked man lies moaning in an apartment a few blocks from Canal Street. His jaundiced body is mottled with bruises where vessels have hemorrhaged. The pillow and bedside are caked with blood that he has vomited. The man's breathing is labored as he drowns in his own fluids.The window of the room is shut tightly, letting in no breath of air - and letting out none of the thousands of mosquitoes that cover the walls and the man's body. linkurl:__Aedes aegypti__;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/54316/ is not the most common species along the Gulf Coast, but anyone with a course in linkurl:medical entomology;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/12576/ could build a simple trap and conscript a bloodthirsty army. Across the hall, another man cracks his door and peers out. Seeing nobody in the hallway, he emerges wearing linkurl:beekeepers';http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53776/ garb....

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