What neo-creationists get right

An evolutionist shares lessons he's learned from the Intelligent Design camp

Gordy Slack
Jun 19, 2008
Two and a half years ago, in what is so far the "trial of this century," federal district judge John Jones III linkurl:ruled;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/194/ that it was unconstitutional for a school board in Dover, PA to teach linkurl:intelligent design;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/36664/ (ID) theory in a public high school science class. The decision was stunning; the ID movement lost on every front. When Jones called the school board's efforts to introduce ID into the curriculum "staggering inanity," the anti-ID chorus roared its support. Jones declared the ID movement's science bogus, their tactics corrupt, and their religious motivations transparent. Intelligent design, Jones said, is the most recent species in the highly adaptive lineage known as linkurl:American Creationism.;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/15273/ The Dover trial seemed, for a brief moment, to be a wooden stake driven into the heart of creationism. But ID is once again back up and on the march. So far in 2008, legislators in Alabama, Florida,...

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