New President, Please

Few voters in next week's US presidential election will embrace absolutely everything that either candidate stands for, or, for that matter, reject absolutely everything. Nevertheless, a change must be made, judged on a few key issues. The most pressing issues include the quagmire that is Iraq, national security, healthcare provision, and the economy. But science should not be too far behind, and anyone with the best interests of science at heart will have no hesitation in selecting John Kerry o

Richard Gallagher
Oct 24, 2004

Few voters in next week's US presidential election will embrace absolutely everything that either candidate stands for, or, for that matter, reject absolutely everything. Nevertheless, a change must be made, judged on a few key issues. The most pressing issues include the quagmire that is Iraq, national security, healthcare provision, and the economy. But science should not be too far behind, and anyone with the best interests of science at heart will have no hesitation in selecting John Kerry over George Bush.

Over the past four years President Bush's administration has weakened science in the United States across the board. Scientific advice for decision-making has been downgraded, as seen in the record delay in choosing a scientific advisor and the subsequent devaluation of the position. The pipeline of new scientific talent from overseas has been constricted and support for research has been reduced, with a few notable exceptions such as...

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