Features
Sly Guys
Sly Guys
The Scientist Staff | Jul 1, 2014
Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.
Designer Livestock
Designer Livestock
Jef Akst | Jun 1, 2014
New technologies will make it easier to manipulate animal genomes, but food products from genetically engineered animals face a long road to market.
Tactical Maneuvers
Tactical Maneuvers
Stephanie Swift | Jun 1, 2014
Scientists are creating viruses that naturally home in on tumor cells while simultaneously boosting the body’s immune system to fight cancer.
Where the Wild Things Were
Where the Wild Things Were
Daniel Cossins | May 1, 2014
Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.
Building Flesh and Blood
Building Flesh and Blood
Jalees Rehman | May 1, 2014
Understanding how networks of blood vessels form is key to engineering transplantable organs and tissues.
Metals on our Mind
Metals on our Mind
Anthony White | Apr 1, 2014
A dramatic loss of copper in key brain regions may be central to Alzheimer’s disease. Could restoring metals in the brain help?
Overcoming Resistance
Overcoming Resistance
The Scientist Staff | Apr 1, 2014
In the face of bacterial threats that can evade modern medicines, researchers are trying every trick in the book to develop new, effective antibiotics.
Viruses Reconsidered
Viruses Reconsidered
Didier Raoult | Mar 1, 2014
The discovery of more and more viruses of record-breaking size calls for a reclassification of life on Earth.
 
A Twist of Fate
A Twist of Fate
Jonathan Slack | Mar 1, 2014
Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.
Brains in Action
Brains in Action
The Scientist Staff | Feb 1, 2014
Neuroscientists are automating neural imaging and recording, allowing them to monitor increasingly large swaths of the brain in living, behaving animals.