Can Viruses in the Genome Cause Disease?
Can Viruses in the Genome Cause Disease?
Clinical trials that target human endogenous retroviruses to treat multiple sclerosis, ALS, and other ailments are underway, but many questions remain about how these sequences may disrupt our biology.
Can Viruses in the Genome Cause Disease?
Can Viruses in the Genome Cause Disease?

Clinical trials that target human endogenous retroviruses to treat multiple sclerosis, ALS, and other ailments are underway, but many questions remain about how these sequences may disrupt our biology.

Clinical trials that target human endogenous retroviruses to treat multiple sclerosis, ALS, and other ailments are underway, but many questions remain about how these sequences may disrupt our biology.

Features
Cities Can Serve as Cauldrons of Evolution
Cities Can Serve as Cauldrons of Evolution
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2019
From changes in gene flow to adaptation, the effects of urbanization are shaping the evolutionary trajectories of plants and animals.
Bacteria Harbor Geometric “Organelles”
Bacteria Harbor Geometric “Organelles”
Amber Dance | Dec 1, 2018
Microbes, traditionally thought to lack organelles, get a metabolic boost from geometric compartments that act as cauldrons for chemical reactions. Bioengineers are eager to harness the compartments for their own purposes.
2018 Top 10 Innovations
2018 Top 10 Innovations
The Scientist Staff | Dec 1, 2018
Biology happens on many levels, from ecosystems to electron transport chains. These tools may help spur discoveries at all of life's scales.
These Organelles Have No Membranes
These Organelles Have No Membranes
Michael Crabtree, Tim Nott | Dec 1, 2018
From making ribosomes to protecting the integrity of the genome, these membraneless compartments play important roles in the cell. Their behavior is rooted in basic physics.
How Exercise Reprograms the Brain
How Exercise Reprograms the Brain
Ashley Yeager | Nov 1, 2018
As researchers unravel the molecular machinery that links exercise and cognition, working out is emerging as a promising neurotherapy.
The Biological Roots of Intelligence
The Biological Roots of Intelligence
Shawna Williams | Nov 1, 2018
Imaging, behavioral, and genetic data yield clues to what’s behind effective thinking.
When Should Service Dogs Be Admitted into the Lab?
When Should Service Dogs Be Admitted into the Lab?
Jef Akst | Nov 1, 2018
Becoming a neuroscientist with a service dog by your side presents numerous challenges. Joey Ramp, who went back to college to study her own post-traumatic stress disorder, is learning this the hard way.
Life Thrives Within the Earth’s Crust
Life Thrives Within the Earth’s Crust
Catherine Offord | Oct 1, 2018
From journeys into mines to explorations of volcanoes on the ocean floor, deep voyages reveal the richness of the planet’s deep biosphere.
Belly Fat Has a Role to Play in Fighting Infections
Belly Fat Has a Role to Play in Fighting Infections
Selene Meza-Perez, Troy D. Randall | Oct 1, 2018
Hanging in front of the abdomen like an apron, the depot of visceral fat known as the omentum helps regulate immune responses.