Anthony S. Fauci

First Person | Anthony S. Fauci Courtesy of NIAID On normal days, he works 14 hours, jogs for lunch, eats dinner with his family after 9, and continues working until bedtime, when he sleeps for about 4 1/2 hours. But normal is long gone for Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He has bioterrorism worries and SARS on his plate, along with AIDS, which put Fauci's name in the limelight years ago, when gay men demanded being heard, noticed, an

The Scientist Staff
May 4, 2003

First Person | Anthony S. Fauci

Courtesy of NIAID

On normal days, he works 14 hours, jogs for lunch, eats dinner with his family after 9, and continues working until bedtime, when he sleeps for about 4 1/2 hours. But normal is long gone for Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He has bioterrorism worries and SARS on his plate, along with AIDS, which put Fauci's name in the limelight years ago, when gay men demanded being heard, noticed, and respected. It was Fauci, raised in Brooklyn, educated by Jesuits, who said, "Bring them to the table."

Fauci, 62, says he's an NIH lifer. "This is very suited to me. When you can have an impact on the public health of this nation, and [consequently] an impact on the public health of the rest of the world, that's what really gives me satisfaction."...