Caught on Camera

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

Oct 1, 2018
The Scientist Staff
KOALA CODE: This summer, researchers published the entire genome sequence of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).
Posted: July 3, 2018
R.N. Johnson et al., Nat Genet, doi:10.1038/s41588-018-0153-5, 2018. Courtesy of Rebecca Johnson


XENOPUS PIGMENT: Earlier this year, researchers used single-guide RNAs with a fluorescent tracer to alter pigment genes in embryos of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis). The treatment resulted in the right half of embryos lacking pigment, as shown in the neurula stage (top) and at a later developmental period (bottom).
Posted: May 18, 2018
B. Delay et al., Genetics,  doi:10.1534/genetics.117.300468, 2018. Courtesy of Vanja Krneta-Stankic


KALEIDOSCOPE: Scientists recently determined that different alleles of one transcription factor, called Pannier, lead to the four main color morphs of the harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis).
Posted: August 27, 2018
M. Gautier et al., Curr Biol, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2018.08.023, 2018. Courtesy of Benjamin Prud'homme and Junichi Yamaguch


SINGLE ORIGIN: The same genes direct the development of scales in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and skin appendages in terrestrial animals, according to recently published research.
Posted: August 10, 2018
A.J. Aman et al., eLife, doi:10.7554/eLife.37001, 2018


NEW NEURONS: This spring, scientists reported a unique "genetic fingerprint" that allowed them to follow a type of neuron in mouse eyes, from birth to maturity.
Posted: March 28, 2018
M. Niquille et al., eLife, doi:10.7554/eLife.32017, 2018. Courtesy of Alexandre Dayer
ORIGINAL FIN: A Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) with normal dorsal and paired pectoral/pelvic fins (top). When researchers knocked out a single genetic enhancer, named ZRS, the fins did not develop normally (bottom).
Posted: April 2, 2018
J. Letelier et al., Nat Genet, doi:10.1038/s41588-018-0080-5, 2018