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Caught on Camera

See some of the coolest images recently featured by The Scientist

The Scientist Staff
         
HUMAN POLLUTION: An international team of scientists used sensitive instruments to show that oil from human skin reacts with ozone to generate potent, free radicals. These chemicals can further react with most organic compounds present in the indoor environment to produce dangerous pollutants.
Mikal Schlosser
         
SENSING FAT: Researchers recently published results showing that sensory neurons (labeled in fluorescence here) project from their origin, near the spinal cord (top) into the adipose tissue (bottom) of an adult mouse. Posted: September 9, 2022
Scripps Research
          CHROMOSOME LOVE: Researchers have created mice with novel haploid karyotypes by ligating chromosome 4 (green) and 5 (red) in vitro, then injecting cells carrying the fused chromosomes into wildtype oocytes. Posted: August 25, 2022
CHROMOSOME LOVE: Researchers have created mice with novel haploid karyotypes by ligating chromosome 4 (green) and 5 (red) in vitro, then injecting cells carrying the fused chromosomes into wildtype oocytes. Posted: August 25, 2022
Li-Bin Wang
          STONE AGE SURGERY: Archaeologists working in Borneo recently uncovered the remains of a Stone Age young adult human who apparently had their left leg amputated roughly 31,000 years ago. Posted: September 7, 2022
STONE AGE SURGERY: Archaeologists working in Borneo recently uncovered the remains of a Stone Age young adult human who apparently had their left leg amputated roughly 31,000 years ago. Posted: September 7, 2022
Fig. 3A from Nature, doi: 10.1038/S41586-022-05160-8, 2022. CC By 4.0
          LONG LIVE THE QUEEN: Queen ants, such as this Harpegnathos saltator queen, can live up to 10 times longer than workers in their colonies. Scientists recently published a paper that suggests disrupted insulin signaling in queens as a possible explanation for this lifespan disparity. Posted: September 2, 2022
LONG LIVE THE QUEEN: Queen ants, such as this Harpegnathos saltator queen, can live up to 10 times longer than workers in their colonies. Scientists recently published a paper that suggests disrupted insulin signaling in queens as a possible explanation for this lifespan disparity. Posted: September 2, 2022
Hua Yan

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