Happenings

Happenings
The Scientist Staff | May 1, 1988
David W Kingsbury of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., will become senior scientific officer of the How- ard Hughes Medical Institute, Bethesda, Md., in July. Kingsbury’s research has focused on the virology of paramyxoviruses. He joined the hospital’s division of virology and molecular biology in 1963. Alan W Steiss, associate provost for research and director of sponsored programs at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Bl
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Apr 3, 1988
George A. (Jay) Keyworth II, nuclear physicist and chairman of the Washington, D.C.-based industrial consulting firm, the Keyworth Company, has become director of research for the Hudson Institute for public policy research, Indianapolis, Ind. From 1981 to 1985, Keyworth was Science Adviser to President Reagan. He is currently a director of the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico and the Center for Excellence in Education in McLean, Va. He holds a Ph.D. from Duke University. Robert A. Rouse, f
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Mar 20, 1988
Brian Wilkinson, professor of civil engineering and deputy dean of the Royal Military College of Science at Shrivenham, U.K., has been appointed director of the Natural Environment Research Council’s Institute of Hydrology and head of NERC's Wallingford Laboratory, effective July 5. Wilkinson spent nine years with the Water Research Center as head of the water resources division and head of the communications group. To 18 Individuals. The National Academy of Sciences will present t
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Mar 6, 1988
PEOPLE DEATHS AWARDS SCIENCE ARCHIVE Three MIT scientists, Robert Horvitz, Richard O. Hynes and Susumu Tonegawa, have been appointed Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators as part of a new long-term collaborative agreement to conduct biomedical research at MIT. HHMI will help fund the research and will donate $15 million toward the construction of a new MIT research facility. Caroline L. Herzenberg, Argonne National Laboratory, became president of the national Association fo
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Feb 21, 1988
PEOPLE DEATHS MEETINGS CORRECTION Avedis Donabedian, Professor of Public Health at the University of Michigan, will retire in May. Donabedian joined the university in 1961 as an associate professor of public health economics. He was born in Beirut and studied at the American University of Beirut and the Harvard School of Public Health. Klaus Fuchs, 76, the German-born nuclear physicist who was jailed in the 1950s for giving U.S. and British atomic bomb secrets to the Soviet Union, d
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Feb 7, 1988
NEW PUBLICATIONS Engineering Optics an Institute of Physics reprint journal that contains applied and engineering optics papers previously published in IOP journals, debuts this month The quarterly journal covers papers on fiber optics; optical communications, Integrated Optics optical sensors, lasers and displays and optical systems design. Charter two-year subscription rates are $56 (25 pounds U.K., 32 pounds overseas); personal subscriptions are $28 per year (12.50 pounds U.K., 16 pounds ov
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Jan 24, 1988
PEOPLE AWARDS OPPORTUNITIES ETCETERA MEETINGS During the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ winter hearing in December, Ernest L. Daman, senior vice president and director of research for Foster Wheeler Corporation, Livingston, N.J., was elected ASME president, effective June 1988. Daman joined Foster Wheeler in 1947 as an engineer in its research division, and became director of research in 1960. In 1976 he was elected chairman of the board of the Foster Wheeler Developme
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Jan 10, 1988
PEOPLE AWARDS DEATHS OPPORTUNITIES ETCETERA MEETINGS NEW PUBLICATIONS Clayton F. Caills, director-at-large of the American Chemical Society board, has been elected ACS president for 1989. Callis retired from his position as director of environmental operations for Monsanto Fibers & Intermediates Co. in 1985, and became vice president of Chelan Associates, an environmental consulting firm in St. Louis. Ernest L. Ellel, ACS board chairman and WR. Kenan Professor of Chemistry at the Univers
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Dec 13, 1987
Edward J. Poziomek, former director of research, U.S. Army Chemical Research at the Development and Engineering Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., became Sigma Xi’s new executive director on December 1. Poziomek joined the society in 1961 and has served on the board of directors since 1976. His areas of research include surface chemistry, spectroscopy, physical-organic chemistry and organic synthesis. Charles E. Hammer Jr., associate vice president for health affairs and professor
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Nov 29, 1987
The congressional board of the Office of Technology Assessment appointed four new members to four-year terms on the Technology Assessment Advisory Council, effective February 1988: Neil Han, Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor of Economics, Iowa State University; James C. Hunt, chancellor of the Health Science Center and vice president for health affairs, University of Tennessee; Joshua Lederberg, president, Rockefeller University; and Sally Ride, Stanford University. Center for Internat
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Nov 15, 1987
PEOPLE Melvin N.A. Peterson, former director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography’s international deep sea drilling project at the University of California, San Diego, was nominated first chief scientist of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Peterson will be one of NOAA’s chief policy advisers on environmental issues and will serve as its principal spokesman on science and technology. The International Union of Pure & Applied Chemistry voted French inorgan
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Nov 1, 1987
John Simpson, University of Chicago physicist, was named the third Martin Marietta Chair in Space History by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington. Simpson designed and built U.S. instruments that were carried aboard Soviet spacecraft to encounter Halley’s Comet in 1986. During his year as chair, he will work with the Air and Space Museum and the University of Chicago to prepare historical accounts of his accomplishments. G. Tom Shires, professor
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Oct 18, 1987
PEOPLE The Federation of American Scientists chose six new council members this summer: Julius Axelrod, Nobel laureate, National Institute of Mental Health; Deborah Bleviss, executive director, International Institute for Energy Conservation; Dudley R. Herschbach, Nobel laureate, professor of science, Harvard University; Art Hobson, professor of physics, University of Arkansas; Stephen H. Schneider, deputy director, National Center for Atmospheric Research Advanced Study Program and Robert A.
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Oct 4, 1987
The Association of American Medical Colleges has appointed two new executives to its Washington branch. Robert I. Levy, senior associate vice president for health sciences at Columbia University, will become vice president for biomedical research January 1, 1988, and Edwin I. Crocker, vice president for finance and treasurer of the AAMC in Mills College, Oakland, Calif., will become vice president for administrative services on November 16. Levy has served as dean of the medical school and vice
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Sep 20, 1987
PEOPLE William R. Brody, chairman of Resonex Inc., a manufacturer of magnetic resonance imaging devices, has been named professor and director of the department of radiology and radiological science at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. In 1984, Brody founded Resonex Inc. after spending six years with the department of radiology and electrical engineering at Stanford University. This month, he will assume the responsibilities of Martin W. Donner, who has held the post at Johns Hopkins sin
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Sep 6, 1987
Howard E. Morgan became the new president of the American Heart Association on June 22. M(frgan will continue at the Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, in his capacity as director of the Siegfried and Janet Weis Center for Research, as well as continuing to direct the development of a new program of basic investigation into cardiovascular disease. Peter Bond became the new Chairman of the Physics Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory in July. Bond sees relativistic heavy ion physics as th
Royal Society Medals and Awards
The Scientist Staff | Sep 6, 1987
Sir Francis Graham-Smith, Astronomer Royal and director of Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratory, for his contributions to radio and optical astronomy. Sir Eric Denton, secretary of the Marine Biological Association, for his contributions to the physiology of marine animals, to marine biology in general, and his leadership of U.K. marine science. G.V.R. Born, Emeritus Professor of Pharmacology, University of London, Kings College, to honor his many contributions to the physiology, pathology and
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Aug 9, 1987
Robert Hoffmann, director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History, has been named Assistant Secretary for Research, effective January 1, 1988. Prior to joining the Smithsonian staff, Hoffmann was Summerfield Distinguished Professor at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, and curator of mammals at the University of Kansas Museum of Natural History. As assistant secretary, Hoffmann will serve as the principal adviser to the secretary and undersecretary on the Smit
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Jul 26, 1987
Carl M. Mansfield, professor and chairman of radiation therapy and nuclear medicine at Thomas Jefferson University, has been elected president-elect of the American Radium Society. The new president is Morris J. Wizenberg, attending radiation therapist and head of the division of radiation oncology at Mercy Health Center in Oklahoma City. The 800-member ARS, founded in 1916, is an interdisciplinary society of cancer physicians dedicated to promoting cancer research and encouraging cooperation an
Happenings
The Scientist Staff | Jul 12, 1987
R. Palmer Beasley, known for his work that linked the hepatitis B virus to liver cancer, has been appointed dean of the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston. Beasley is currently professor of medicine and head of the Division of Communicable Disease Epidemiology at the University of California at San Francisco. He is also director of the American University Medical Center in Taipei, Taiwan, a position he will continue to hold after his move to Houston. Mitchell Feigenbaum has