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Aging And Genetics

C.E. Yu, J. Oshima, Y.H. Fu, E.M. Wijsman, F. Hisama, R. Alisch, S. Matthews, J. Nakura, T. Miki, S. Ouais, G.M. Martin, J. Mulligan, G.D. Schellenberg, "Positional cloning of the Werner's syndrome gene," Science, 272:258-62, 1996. (Cited in more than 175 papers since publication) Comments by Gerard D. Schellenberg, associate director for research, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Seattle Aging is a real stumper. Is it the result of natural we

The Scientist Staff

C.E. Yu, J. Oshima, Y.H. Fu, E.M. Wijsman, F. Hisama, R. Alisch, S. Matthews, J. Nakura, T. Miki, S. Ouais, G.M. Martin, J. Mulligan, G.D. Schellenberg, "Positional cloning of the Werner's syndrome gene," Science, 272:258-62, 1996. (Cited in more than 175 papers since publication)

Comments by Gerard D. Schellenberg, associate director for research, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Seattle

Aging is a real stumper. Is it the result of natural wear and tear? Does it have a genetic cause? Some regard it as a disease to be cured. Researchers hope to get a handle on the process by studying the genetic causes behind Werner's syndrome, a recessive disorder that causes its victims to die--of old age, it appears--by their mid-20s.


"...if we can understand the function of this helicase, we can understand at least one segment of the aging process..."

--Gerard D. Schellenberg...

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