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Arabidopsis thaliana, Meet Microarray Technology

Courtesy of Steve Kay Data derived from the Science Watch/Hot Papers database and the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. P. Schenk et al., "Coordinated plant defense responses in Arabidopsis revealed by microarray analysis," Proc Natl Acad Sci, 97:11655-60, 2000. (Cited in 118 papers) S. Harmer et al., "Orchestrated transcription of key pathways in Arabidopsis by the circadian clock," S

Jim Kling
Courtesy of Steve Kay



Data derived from the Science Watch/Hot Papers database and the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

P. Schenk et al., "Coordinated plant defense responses in Arabidopsis revealed by microarray analysis," Proc Natl Acad Sci, 97:11655-60, 2000. (Cited in 118 papers)

S. Harmer et al., "Orchestrated transcription of key pathways in Arabidopsis by the circadian clock," Science, 290:2110-3, 2000. (Cited in 112 papers)
 

Even before researchers had sequenced the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, the small flowering relative of broccoli and a favorite model organism,1 others in the budding field of microarray analysis were attempting to glean its secrets. This issue's Hot Papers represent two early and successful attempts at connecting Arabidopsis gene expression to Arabidopsis biology, using only a fraction of...

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