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Atmospheric Chemistry

T.J. Wallington, M.D. Hurley, J.C. Ball, E.W. Kaiser, "Atmospheric chemistry of hydro-fluorocarbon 134a: Fate of the alkoxy radical CF3CFHO," Environmental Science & Technology, 26:1318-24, 1992. Tim Wallington (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Mich.): "Recognition of the adverse impact of chlorofluoro-carbons (CFCs) on stratospheric ozone has prompted an international effort to replace CFCs with environmentally acceptable alternatives. Hy

The Scientist Staff
T.J. Wallington, M.D. Hurley, J.C. Ball, E.W. Kaiser, "Atmospheric chemistry of hydro-fluorocarbon 134a: Fate of the alkoxy radical CF3CFHO," Environmental Science & Technology, 26:1318-24, 1992.

Tim Wallington (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Mich.): "Recognition of the adverse impact of chlorofluoro-carbons (CFCs) on stratospheric ozone has prompted an international effort to replace CFCs with environmentally acceptable alternatives. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are an important class of CFC replacements. HFC-134a (CF3CFH2) is a replacement for CFC-12 (CF2Cl2) in domestic refrigeration and automobile air conditioning units. Investment in HFC- 134a is on the order of a billion dollars! "Prior to the large-scale industrial use of HFC-134a, the environmental impact of its release into the atmosphere needs consideration. HFC-134a does not contain chlorine and so has no ozone-depletion potential associated with the well-established chlorine catalytic cycles. However, there has been speculation that CF3 radicals (formed during the atmospheric degradation of HFC-134a) could impact stratospheric ozone. To...

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