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Atmospheric Science

P.16 M.P. McCormick, R.E. Veiga, "SAGE II measurements of early Pinatubo aerosols," Geophysical Research Letters, 19:155-8, 1992. M. Patrick McCormick (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.): "Since 1979, the global view of aerosols in the stratosphere and upper troposphere has been provided almost exclusively by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II (SAM II) and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE I and II) series of satellite i

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P.16

M.P. McCormick, R.E. Veiga, "SAGE II measurements of early Pinatubo aerosols," Geophysical Research Letters, 19:155-8, 1992.

M. Patrick McCormick (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.): "Since 1979, the global view of aerosols in the stratosphere and upper troposphere has been provided almost exclusively by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II (SAM II) and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE I and II) series of satellite instruments. The resulting data sets have shown that naturally occurring atmospheric aerosols (sub-micron-sized particles composed mainly of aqueous sulfuric acid) are not uniformly distributed, but rather undergo large changes resulting from volcanic eruptions and in response to atmospheric dynamics, microphysical growth, and gravitational sedimentation. A specialized type of `aerosol' also appears in the form of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) inside the Antarctic vortex during the cold polar night. These clouds provide catalytic surfaces upon which heterogeneous reactions free reactive chlorine...

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