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Biochemistry

p.15 C.J. Molloy, D.P. Bottaro, T.P. Fleming, M.S. Marshall, et al., "PDGF induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of GTPase activating protein," Nature, 342:711-14, 1989. Chris Molloy (Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Princeton, N.J.): "One of the greatest challenges in cell growth research is to unravel the complex intracellular biochemical pathways, initiated by growth factor binding at the cell surface, that lead to mitogenesis and cell division. For many growth fact

The Scientist Staff

p.15

C.J. Molloy, D.P. Bottaro, T.P. Fleming, M.S. Marshall, et al., "PDGF induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of GTPase activating protein," Nature, 342:711-14, 1989.

Chris Molloy (Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Princeton, N.J.): "One of the greatest challenges in cell growth research is to unravel the complex intracellular biochemical pathways, initiated by growth factor binding at the cell surface, that lead to mitogenesis and cell division. For many growth factor receptors, activation of protein tyrosine kinase activity is a critical early event. This has led to an intensive search for cellular substrates of the tyrosine kinases. Cellular guanine nucleotide-binding Ras proteins have also been implicated in growth factor signal transduction, although the exact mechanisms are unknown (L.S. Mulcahy, et al., Nature, 313:241-3, 1985). More recently, Meg Trahey and Frank McCormick of Cetus Corp. have shown that Ras proteins are regulated by an endogenous GTPase-activating protein (GAP) (Science, 238:542-5, 1987). Our paper...

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