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Breast Cancer Genetics

Edited By: Thomas W. Durso CLUE GENE: Barbara Weber's team and two other confirmed a link between BRCA1 and breast and ovarian cancer. L.H. Castilla, F.J. Couch, M.R. Erdos, K.F. Hoskins, K. Calzone, J.E. Garber, J. Boyd, M.B. Lubin, M.L. Deshano, L.C. Brody, F.S. Collins, B.L. Weber, "Mutations in the BRCA1 gene in families with early-onset breast and ovarian cancer," Nature Genetics, 8:387-91, 1994. (Cited in 70 publications through August 1996) Comments by Barbara L. Weber, University of

The Scientist Staff

Edited By: Thomas W. Durso

Barbara Weber
CLUE GENE: Barbara Weber's team and two other confirmed a link between BRCA1 and breast and ovarian cancer.
L.H. Castilla, F.J. Couch, M.R. Erdos, K.F. Hoskins, K. Calzone, J.E. Garber, J. Boyd, M.B. Lubin, M.L. Deshano, L.C. Brody, F.S. Collins, B.L. Weber, "Mutations in the BRCA1 gene in families with early-onset breast and ovarian cancer," Nature Genetics, 8:387-91, 1994. (Cited in 70 publications through August 1996) Comments by Barbara L. Weber, University of Pennsylvania

When a team led by University of Utah geneticist Mark Skolnick announced the discovery of a breast-cancer susceptibility gene (Y. Miki et al., Science, 266:66-71, 1994; P.A. Futreal et al., Science, 266:120-2, 1994), it barely beat out several other groups conducting similar research.

But three of the competing teams that were chasing after the same gene made their mark by publishing papers that confirmed...

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