Cancer Biology

Edited by: Thomas W. Durso and Karen Young Kreeger J. Jen, J.W. Harper, S.H. Bigner, D.D. Bigner, N. Papadopoulos, S. Markowitz, J.K.V. Willson, K.W. Kinzler, B. Vogelstein, "Deletion of p16 and p15 genes in brain tumors," Cancer Research, 54:6353-8, 1994. (Cited in more than 100 publications through August 1996) Comments by Jin Jen, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MISSING GENES: Jin Jen and coworkers at Johns Hopkins found that a pair of genes are lacking in certain b

The Scientist Staff
Sep 29, 1996

Edited by: Thomas W. Durso and Karen Young Kreeger
J. Jen, J.W. Harper, S.H. Bigner, D.D. Bigner, N. Papadopoulos, S. Markowitz, J.K.V. Willson, K.W. Kinzler, B. Vogelstein, "Deletion of p16 and p15 genes in brain tumors," Cancer Research, 54:6353-8, 1994. (Cited in more than 100 publications through August 1996) Comments by Jin Jen, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore

Jin Jen
MISSING GENES: Jin Jen and coworkers at Johns Hopkins found that a pair of genes are lacking in certain brain tumors, called glioblastomas.
Because cancer results from the uncontrolled division of cells, anything that is believed to regulate cell growth automatically stirs interest among researchers.

And so it went when scientists discovered that a gene called p16 was found to be lacking in many human tumors (A. Kamb et al., Science, 264:436-40, 1994), according to Jin Jen, an assistant professor in the head and neck...

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