Cancer Genetics

C.J. Hussussian, J.P. Struewing, A.M. Goldstein, P.A.T. Higgins, D.S. Ally, M.D. Sheahan, W.H. Clark, M.A. Tucker, D.C. Dracopoli, "Germline p16 mutations in familial melanoma," Nature Genetics, 8:15-21, 1994. (Cited in nearly 130 publications as of February 1996) Comments by Christopher J. Hussussian, Washington University School of Medicine This paper identifies and describes mutations in the p16 gene in families with malignant melanoma. These mutations affect the balance between the protei

Karen Young Kreeger
Apr 1, 1996

C.J. Hussussian, J.P. Struewing, A.M. Goldstein, P.A.T. Higgins, D.S. Ally, M.D. Sheahan, W.H. Clark, M.A. Tucker, D.C. Dracopoli, "Germline p16 mutations in familial melanoma," Nature Genetics, 8:15-21, 1994. (Cited in nearly 130 publications as of February 1996)

Comments by Christopher J. Hussussian, Washington University School of Medicine

This paper identifies and describes mutations in the p16 gene in families with malignant melanoma. These mutations affect the balance between the proteins p16 and cyclin D, which play a role in controlling the cell cycle. When the biochemical balance between these two regulators goes awry, abnormal cell growth can result.

Christopher Hussussian
NOT JUST SKIN DEEP: Washington University researcher Christoper J. Hussussian and NIH coworkers identified in the p16 gene in families with a hitory of malnigant melanoma.
"Although 2.5 percent of all cancers are melanomas, its incidence is doubling every 10 to 20 years," notes Christopher J. Hussussian, a sixth-year...

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