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Cardiology

Edited by: James Kling M. Packer, M.R. Bristow, J.N. Cohn, W.S. Colucci, M.B. Fowler, E.M. Gilbert, N.H. Shusterman, "The effect of carvedilol on morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic heart failure," New England Journal of Medicine, 334:1349-55, 1996. (Cited in more than 160 publications to date) Comments by Edward M. Gilbert, division of cardiology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City STANDARD OF CARE: Research by Utah's Edward Gilbert suggests that blocking nore

James Kling

Edited by: James Kling
M. Packer, M.R. Bristow, J.N. Cohn, W.S. Colucci, M.B. Fowler, E.M. Gilbert, N.H. Shusterman, "The effect of carvedilol on morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic heart failure," New England Journal of Medicine, 334:1349-55, 1996. (Cited in more than 160 publications to date) Comments by Edward M. Gilbert, division of cardiology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City


STANDARD OF CARE: Research by Utah's Edward Gilbert suggests that blocking norepinephrine could be beneficial for heart failure patients.
The mechanistic causes of cancer are becoming more clear as research progresses, and most agree that AIDS stems from the action of a single type of virus. But the roots of heart failure-probably shaded by the complexity of the pathways that regulate blood pressure, heart rate, and physiological responses to exercise-are much more difficult to discern. That's one of the reasons why there hasn't been...

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