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CD4+ T Cell Mechanism Allows HIV-1 Persistence

For this article, Jim Kling interviewed Robert Siliciano, associate professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. D. Finzi, J. Blankson, J.D. Siliciano, J.B. Margolick, K. Chadwick, T. Pierson, K. Smith, J. Lisziewicz, F. Lori, C. Flexner, T.C. Quinn, R.E. Chaisson, E. Rosenberg, B. Walker, S. Gange, J. Gallant, R.F.

Jim Kling
For this article, Jim Kling interviewed Robert Siliciano, associate professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

D. Finzi, J. Blankson, J.D. Siliciano, J.B. Margolick, K. Chadwick, T. Pierson, K. Smith, J. Lisziewicz, F. Lori, C. Flexner, T.C. Quinn, R.E. Chaisson, E. Rosenberg, B. Walker, S. Gange, J. Gallant, R.F. Siliciano, "Latent infection of CD4(+) T cells provides a mechanism for lifelong persistence of HIV-1, even in patients on effective combination therapy," Nature Medicine, 5: 512-7, May 1999. (Cited in 174 papers)


Triple combination anti-HIV therapy often reduces viral load in HIV patients to undetectable levels.1,2 Not long after these treatments were introduced in the mid-1990s, physicians and patients began to hope for a cure....

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