Cell Biology

J.E. Brenman, D.S. Chao, S.H. Gee, A.W. McGee, S.E. Craven, D.R. Santillano, Z.Q. Wu, F. Huang, H.H. Xia, M.F. Peters, S.C. Froehner, D.S. Bredt, "Interaction of nitric oxide synthase with the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 and alpha 1-syntrophin mediated by PDZ domains," Cell, 84:757-67, 1996. (Cited in more than 215 papers since publication) Comments by David S. Bredt, assistant professor of physiology at the University of California at San Francisco School of Medicine Nitric oxide (

The Scientist Staff
Sep 13, 1998

J.E. Brenman, D.S. Chao, S.H. Gee, A.W. McGee, S.E. Craven, D.R. Santillano, Z.Q. Wu, F. Huang, H.H. Xia, M.F. Peters, S.C. Froehner, D.S. Bredt, "Interaction of nitric oxide synthase with the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 and alpha 1-syntrophin mediated by PDZ domains," Cell, 84:757-67, 1996. (Cited in more than 215 papers since publication)

Comments by David S. Bredt, assistant professor of physiology at the University of California at San Francisco School of Medicine

Nitric oxide (NO) is an intriguing molecule. On the one hand, it is a crucial neurotransmitter, whose absence can be devastating. On the other, it is a dangerous free radical that, in excess, can be equally deleterious. Take, for example, stroke and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. During a stroke, a glutamate receptor (N-methyl D-aspartate type) is over-expressed. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) concentrates in the area, releasing NO, which--at the now elevated levels--unleashes its oxidative power and...

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