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Cell Biology

M.L. Fero, M. Rivkin, M. Tasch, P. Porter, C.E. Carow, E. Firpo, K. Polyak, L.-H. Tsai, V. Broudy, R.M. Perlmutter, K. Kaushansky, J.M. Roberts, "A syndrome of multiorgan hyperplasia with features of gigantism, tumorigenesis, and female sterility in p27Kip1-deficient mice," Cell, 85:733-44, 1996. (Cited in more than 100 publications to date) Comments by Matthew L. Fero, division of basic sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle GIGANTIC MICE: Matthew Fero of the Fred Hutchin

The Scientist Staff

M.L. Fero, M. Rivkin, M. Tasch, P. Porter, C.E. Carow, E. Firpo, K. Polyak, L.-H. Tsai, V. Broudy, R.M. Perlmutter, K. Kaushansky, J.M. Roberts, "A syndrome of multiorgan hyperplasia with features of gigantism, tumorigenesis, and female sterility in p27Kip1-deficient mice," Cell, 85:733-44, 1996. (Cited in more than 100 publications to date)

Comments by Matthew L. Fero, division of basic sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle


GIGANTIC MICE: Matthew Fero of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that p27-deficient mice were significantly larger than normal littermates.
Observing the complexity and precision of timing of cell growth, you might think a "ghost in the machine" or an invisible hand orchestrated the whole process. But researchers in cell biology have made significant advances in understanding the miracle of how cells know when to stop growing and dividing. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), together with their cyclin protein subunits, trigger...

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