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Cell Biology

Edited by: Stephen P. Hoffert D.S. Weigle, T.R. Buchowski, D.C. Foster, S. Holderman, J.M. Kramer, G. Lasser, C.E. Lofton-Day, D.E. Prunkard, C. Raymond, J.L. Kuijper, "Recombinant ob protein reduces feeding and body weight in the ob/ob mouse," Journal of Clinical Investigation, 96:2065-70, 1995. (Cited in more than 110 publications to date) Comments by D. Scott Weigle, department of medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle A FULL FEELING: Washington's D. Scott Weigle d

The Scientist Staff

Edited by: Stephen P. Hoffert
D.S. Weigle, T.R. Buchowski, D.C. Foster, S. Holderman, J.M. Kramer, G. Lasser, C.E. Lofton-Day, D.E. Prunkard, C. Raymond, J.L. Kuijper, "Recombinant ob protein reduces feeding and body weight in the ob/ob mouse," Journal of Clinical Investigation, 96:2065-70, 1995. (Cited in more than 110 publications to date)

Comments by D. Scott Weigle, department of medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle

A FULL FEELING: Washington's D. Scott Weigle demonstrated that leptin could bring about weight loss in mice.
In the past, obesity often was considered a sign of weak willpower and a lack of self-restraint. But the discovery of the obese gene (ob gene) in 1994 by Jeffrey Friedman, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at Rockefeller University, has revolutionized the search for new therapies to treat this disorder, which afflicts one in three Americans. The demonstration by D. Scott Weigle, an associate...

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