Collecting Clues to the Mammalian Clock

For this article, Karen Young Kreeger interviewed Steven Reppert, chairman of neurobiology and Higgins Family professor of neuroscience, University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Joseph S. Takahashi, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and the Walter and Mary E. Glass professor, department of neurobiology and physiology at Northwestern University. Data is derived from the Science Watch/Hot Papers database and the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia). P.L. Lowrey et al., "Positiona

Karen Young Kreeger
Apr 14, 2002
For this article, Karen Young Kreeger interviewed Steven Reppert, chairman of neurobiology and Higgins Family professor of neuroscience, University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Joseph S. Takahashi, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and the Walter and Mary E. Glass professor, department of neurobiology and physiology at Northwestern University. Data is derived from the Science Watch/Hot Papers database and the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia).

P.L. Lowrey et al., "Positional syntenic cloning and functional characterization of the mammalian circadian mutation tau," Science, 288:483-91, 2000. (Cited in 88 papers)

L.P. Shearman et al., "Interacting molecular loops in the mammalian circadian clock," Science, 288:1013-19, 2000. (Cited in 120 papers)



Two papers published nearly back-to-back in 2000 pushed the study of mammalian chronobiology light years ahead. The first paper, from the lab of Joseph S. Takahashi, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and the Walter and Mary E. Glass...

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