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Converging Pathways

For this article, Nadia S. Halim interviewed Kenneth W. Kinzler, professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins Oncology Center. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. T.C. He, A.B. Sparks, C. Rago, H. Hermeking, L. Zawel, L.T. da Costa, P.J. Morin, B. Vogelstein, K.W. Kinzler, "Identification of c-MYC as a target of the APC pathway," Science, 281:1509-12, Sept. 4, 1998. (Cited in more t

Nadia Halim

For this article, Nadia S. Halim interviewed Kenneth W. Kinzler, professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins Oncology Center. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

T.C. He, A.B. Sparks, C. Rago, H. Hermeking, L. Zawel, L.T. da Costa, P.J. Morin, B. Vogelstein, K.W. Kinzler, "Identification of c-MYC as a target of the APC pathway," Science, 281:1509-12, Sept. 4, 1998. (Cited in more than 200 papers since publication)

Genes are often tied together to form intricate pathways. One defective gene may affect several others down the road and ultimately result in disease. Kenneth Kinzler, professor of oncology, Bert Vogelstein, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and their lab at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center focus on defective genes involved in colon cancer. Most human...

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