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Coronary Disease

POSITIVE REDUCTION: Frank M. Sacks (left) of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard University led a study that demonstrated that lowering cholesterol in patients from average to low levels significantly reduced the number of recurrent coronary events. The research team also included Lemuel A. Moye (right) of the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston. F.M. Sacks, M.A. Pfeffer, L.A. Moye, J.L. Rouleau, J.D. Rutherford, T.G. Cole, L. Brown, J.W. Warnica, J.M.O. Arnold, C.C. W

The Scientist Staff

POSITIVE REDUCTION: Frank M. Sacks (left) of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard University led a study that demonstrated that lowering cholesterol in patients from average to low levels significantly reduced the number of recurrent coronary events. The research team also included Lemuel A. Moye (right) of the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston.
F.M. Sacks, M.A. Pfeffer, L.A. Moye, J.L. Rouleau, J.D. Rutherford, T.G. Cole, L. Brown, J.W. Warnica, J.M.O. Arnold, C.C. Wun, B.R. Davis, E. Braunwald, "The effect of pravastatin on coronary events after myocardial infarction in patients with average cholesterol levels," The New England Journal of Medicine, 335(14):1001-9, 1996. (Cited more than 290 times to date)

Comments by Frank M. Sacks, associate professor of medicine and nutrition, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard University.

Since the mid-1980s, physicians have known some of the health benefits from lowering cholesterol in patients with coronary...

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