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Deconstructing Tumor Necrosis Factor

For this article, Jennifer Fisher Wilson interviewed Marcus E. Peter, an associate professor at the Ben May Institute for Cancer Research, University of Chicago. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. C. Scaffidi, S. Fulda, A. Srinivasan, C. Friesen, F. Li, K.J. Tomaselli, K.M. Debatin, P.H. Krammer, and M.E. Peter, "Two CD95 (APO-1/Fas) signaling pathways," EMBO Journal, 17[6]:1

Jennifer Fisher Wilson

For this article, Jennifer Fisher Wilson interviewed Marcus E. Peter, an associate professor at the Ben May Institute for Cancer Research, University of Chicago. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

C. Scaffidi, S. Fulda, A. Srinivasan, C. Friesen, F. Li, K.J. Tomaselli, K.M. Debatin, P.H. Krammer, and M.E. Peter, "Two CD95 (APO-1/Fas) signaling pathways," EMBO Journal, 17[6]:1675-87, March 16, 1998. (Cited in more than 210 papers since publication)

Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has long been known to scientists as the key player in regulating cell proliferation and death. But only recently have scientists begun to understand how TNF and its related family members, the death ligands, function.

Diseases including cancer and AIDS are now known to be characterized by dysregulated apoptosis involving a subgroup...

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