Disputing a Theory About AIDS Progression

For this article, Jim Kling interviewed Louis J. Picker, associate director of the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute at the Oregon Health Sciences University. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. C.J. Pitcher, C. Quittner, D.M. Peterson, M. Connors, R.A. Koup, V.C. Maino, L.J. Picker, "HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T cells are detectable in most individuals with active HIV-1 infection

Jim Kling
May 13, 2001
For this article, Jim Kling interviewed Louis J. Picker, associate director of the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute at the Oregon Health Sciences University. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

C.J. Pitcher, C. Quittner, D.M. Peterson, M. Connors, R.A. Koup, V.C. Maino, L.J. Picker, "HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T cells are detectable in most individuals with active HIV-1 infection, but decline with prolonged viral suppression," Nature Medicine, 5:518-525, May 1999. (Cited in 115 papers.)


For several years, HIV-specific CD4+ memory/effector T cells (CD4+ T cells) have been at the heart of a debate surrounding the progression of AIDS. Four years ago, a paper published in Science1 suggested that these cells, which assist the antiviral response of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, are destroyed early...

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