Entomology

E.C. Masteller, K.M. Buzby, "Composition and temporal abundance of aquatic insect emergence from a tropical rainforest stream, Quebrada Prieta, at El Verde, Puerto Rico: Introduction," Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society, 66:133-9, 1993. Ed Masteller (Division of Science, Behrend College, Pennsylvania State University, Erie): "Long-term investigations were conducted in an island tropical rainforest with an aseasonal environm

Apr 18, 1994
The Scientist Staff

E.C. Masteller, K.M. Buzby, "Composition and temporal abundance of aquatic insect emergence from a tropical rainforest stream, Quebrada Prieta, at El Verde, Puerto Rico: Introduction," Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society, 66:133-9, 1993.

Ed Masteller (Division of Science, Behrend College, Pennsylvania State University, Erie): "Long-term investigations were conducted in an island tropical rainforest with an aseasonal environment using an emergence trap to collect adult aquatic insects. This study involved six specialists of different aquatic insect groups and produced the following six papers in J. Kansas Entomol. Soc.: one (O.S. Flint, Jr., et al., 66:140-50) on caddisflies (Trichop-tera); one (M.L. Pescador, et al., 66:151-60) on mayflies (Ephemero-ptera); one (J.K. Gelhaus, et al., 66:160-6) on crane flies (Tipulidae); one (L.C. Ferrington, Jr., et al., 66:167-80) on midges (Chirono-midae); one (R.H. Wagner, et al., 66:181-86) on mothflies (Psychodidae); and one (E.C. Masteller, et al., 66:187-91) on dance flies, biting midges, and black flies (Empididae, Ceratopogonidae, Sim-uliidae).

"The technique of long-term collecting with an emergence trap gave results that provided a number of significant insights into tropical aquatic insect fauna: a better understanding of biodiversity and phenology of tropical headwater streams; evidence that headwater streams in an insular environment are less diverse than temperate habitats; the occurrence of seasonality patterns in specific groups of insects; and knowledge of geographic affinities of Caribbean aquatic insects. Many aquatic insect adults tended to be smaller in size in the tropics. Support for the seasonality of caddisflies was presented in a three-year continuation of our research in Puerto Rico in E.C. Masteller, et al., Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Trichoptera (Leiden, the Netherlands, Backhuys Publishing, 1993), pages 65-71. "Impacts of this study are: providing baseline data for comparison with other Neotropical habitats and Nearctic streams; and identifying trophic niches for many species. Comparisons of two zoogeographic regions (E.C. Masteller, J. Kansas Entomol. Soc., 66:192-9, 1993) using identical sampling methods is one of the first of its kind.

"Robert B. Waide, director of the terrestrial ecology division at the University of Puerto Rico and Head of the LTER (Long-term Ecological Research) site at El Verde, stated: `This study was a comprehensive effort involving numerous scientists collaborating their efforts and utilizing the facilities of an LTER site to further our understanding of the aquatic ecosystem at a Neotropical habitat.'"