Epidemiology

WEST-COAST COURSE: Nearly a third of the new TB cases in San Francisco were from recent transmissions, relates Stanford University's Peter Small. P.M. Small, P.C. Hopewell, S.P. Singh, A. Paz, J. Parsonnet, D.C. Ruston, G.F. Schecter, C.L. Daley, G.K. Schoolnik, "The epidemiology of tuberculosis in San Francisco: A population-based study using conventional and molecular methods," N. Engl. J. Med., 330:1703-9, 1994. (Cited in more than 50 publications through November 1995) Comments by David A

Karen Young Kreeger
Feb 4, 1996
Peter Small WEST-COAST COURSE: Nearly a third of the new TB cases in San Francisco were from recent transmissions, relates Stanford University's Peter Small.
P.M. Small, P.C. Hopewell, S.P. Singh, A. Paz, J. Parsonnet, D.C. Ruston, G.F. Schecter, C.L. Daley, G.K. Schoolnik, "The epidemiology of tuberculosis in San Francisco: A population-based study using conventional and molecular methods," N. Engl. J. Med., 330:1703-9, 1994. (Cited in more than 50 publications through November 1995)

Comments by David Alland, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, New York; and Peter Small, Stanford University School of Medicine

These two independent studies describe the changing epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) transmission in New York City and San Francisco. Both combined standard epidemiological techniques with DNA fingerprinting- specifically restriction-fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis-to better understand the recent upsurge in tuberculosis cases in both cities.

David Alland EAST-COAST EVIDENCE: In New York, half of the recent...

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