Explaining Membrane Fusion

For this article, James Kling interviewed Thomas Weber, assistant professor in the department of gene therapy and molecular medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that this paper has been cited significantly more often than the average paper of the same type and age. T. Weber, B.V. Zemelman, J.A. McNew, B. Westermann, M. Gmachl, F. Parlati, T.H. Söllner, J.E. Rothman, "SNAREpins: minimal machinery for membrane fusion," Cell, 92:759

James Kling
Mar 19, 2000

For this article, James Kling interviewed Thomas Weber, assistant professor in the department of gene therapy and molecular medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that this paper has been cited significantly more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

T. Weber, B.V. Zemelman, J.A. McNew, B. Westermann, M. Gmachl, F. Parlati, T.H. Söllner, J.E. Rothman, "SNAREpins: minimal machinery for membrane fusion," Cell, 92:759-72, March 20, 1998. (Cited in more than 220 papers since publication)

Maintaining the internal organization of a cell is tricky business. Many cellular functions take place in organelles, and their contents often must be shuttled to one or another location here in the cell. Such cargo is transported by a vesicular transport system. The vesicles bud off from one compartment and then migrate to a specified intracellular compartment or the plasma membrane....

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