Gene Therapy

Edited by: Stephen P. Hoffert M.R. Knowles, K.W. Hohneker, Z. Zhou, J.C. Olson, T.L. Noah, P. Hu, M.W. Leigh, J.F. Engelhardt, L.J. Edwards, K.R. Jones, M. Grossman, J.M. Wilson, L.G. Johnson, R.C. Boucher, "A controlled study of adenoviral-vector-mediated gene transfer in the nasal epithelium of patients with cystic fibrosis," New England Journal of Medicine, 333:823-31, 1995. (Cited in more than 100 papers through September 1997) Comments by Richard C. Boucher, University of North Carolina Cy

Stephen Hoffert
Oct 26, 1997

Edited by: Stephen P. Hoffert
M.R. Knowles, K.W. Hohneker, Z. Zhou, J.C. Olson, T.L. Noah, P. Hu, M.W. Leigh, J.F. Engelhardt, L.J. Edwards, K.R. Jones, M. Grossman, J.M. Wilson, L.G. Johnson, R.C. Boucher, "A controlled study of adenoviral-vector-mediated gene transfer in the nasal epithelium of patients with cystic fibrosis," New England Journal of Medicine, 333:823-31, 1995. (Cited in more than 100 papers through September 1997)

Comments by Richard C. Boucher, University of North Carolina Cystic Fibrosis-Pulmonary Research and Treatment Center.

The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene was isolated as the cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) in 1989. By 1993, gene therapy treatments for patients with CF began in earnest. While early studies reported some success with gene transfer, experimental flaws cast doubt on those results. In 1995, Richard C. Boucher, a professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), would publish a model...

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