Gene Therapy

Y.P. Yang, F.A. Nunes, K. Berencsi, E. Gonczol, J.F. Engelhardt, J.M. Wilson, "Inactivation of E2a in recombinant adenoviruses improves the prospect for gene therapy in cystic fibrosis," Nature Genetics, 7:362-9, 1994. (Cited in more than 75 publications as of April 1996) Comments by James M. Wilson, University of Pennsylvania VIRUS BASHER: Penn's James Wilson limits the mouse immune reaction when testing gene therapy for cystic firbrosis. His technique: Cripple the viral vector. The first

The Scientist Staff
Jun 9, 1996

Y.P. Yang, F.A. Nunes, K. Berencsi, E. Gonczol, J.F. Engelhardt, J.M. Wilson, "Inactivation of E2a in recombinant adenoviruses improves the prospect for gene therapy in cystic fibrosis," Nature Genetics, 7:362-9, 1994. (Cited in more than 75 publications as of April 1996)

Comments by James M. Wilson, University of Pennsylvania


VIRUS BASHER: Penn's James Wilson limits the mouse immune reaction when testing gene therapy for cystic firbrosis. His technique: Cripple the viral vector.
The first human trial that used a virus to transport a cystic fibrosis gene (R.G. Crystal et al., Nature Genetics, 8:42-51, 1994; Hot Papers, The Scientist, Feb. 19, 1996, page 13) was conducted in 1994. Researchers engineered an adenovirus to carry the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which is missing in sufferers of the disease.

However, about a week after therapy was given and the gene-carrying virus delivered its load,...

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