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Genetic Medicine

pp.16 Date: May 30,1994 K.W. Culver, Z. Ram, S. Wallbridge, H. Ishii, E.H. Oldfield, R.M. Blaese, "In vivo gene transfer with retroviral vector producer cells for treatment of experimental brain tumors," Science, 256:1550-2, 1992. Kenneth W. Culver (Human Gene Therapy Research Institute, Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines): "The first observation in our study was that murine retroviral vectors (MRV) could efficiently transfe

The Scientist Staff

pp.16
Date: May 30,1994

K.W. Culver, Z. Ram, S. Wallbridge, H. Ishii, E.H. Oldfield, R.M. Blaese, "In vivo gene transfer with retroviral vector producer cells for treatment of experimental brain tumors," Science, 256:1550-2, 1992.

Kenneth W. Culver (Human Gene Therapy Research Institute, Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines): "The first observation in our study was that murine retroviral vectors (MRV) could efficiently transfer genes into tumor cells in vivo. MRV appeared to selectively deliver genes into tumor cells, since MRV require proliferating target cells. Our subsequent studies have confirmed this selectivity in the central nervous system (Z. Ram et al., Cancer Research, 53:83-8, 1993; Z. Ram et al., Journal of Neurosurgery, 79:400-7, 1993). This high-efficiency, selective gene- transfer method holds promise for gene therapies of a variety of solid tumors, since most normal tissues are not rapidly dividing.

"We also identified a `bystander tumor killing effect.' Current...

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