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Geophysics

C. DeMets, R.G. Gordon, D.F. Argus, S. Stein, "Current plate motions," Geophysical Journal International, 101:425-78, 1990. Charles DeMets (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena): "Accurate models for the present-day velocities of the earth's major tectonic plates have long been useful tools in the earth sciences. Through careful analysis of abundant high-quality seafloor and earthquake data, we have constructed a model free from the significant biases present

The Scientist Staff

C. DeMets, R.G. Gordon, D.F. Argus, S. Stein, "Current plate motions," Geophysical Journal International, 101:425-78, 1990.

Charles DeMets (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena): "Accurate models for the present-day velocities of the earth's major tectonic plates have long been useful tools in the earth sciences. Through careful analysis of abundant high-quality seafloor and earthquake data, we have constructed a model free from the significant biases present in prior models, and have resolved nearly all of the major tectonic problems defined by prior models. Signals such as motion between India and Australia, deformation of plates above subduction zones, and, possibly, a microplate south of New Zealand have for the first time emerged from the noise. Some of the success of this paper can be attributed to its utility to a spectrum of earth scientists; however, the new questions raised by this paper about plate motions and crustal deformation may...

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