Hemophilia: Finding the Right Path

For this article, Jim Kling interviewed Mark Kay, a professor of pediatrics and genetics, and director of the Human Gene Therapy program at Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., and pediatrics professor Katherine High, University of Pennsylvania and the director of research, hematology division at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age. R.

Jim Kling
Sep 16, 2001
For this article, Jim Kling interviewed Mark Kay, a professor of pediatrics and genetics, and director of the Human Gene Therapy program at Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., and pediatrics professor Katherine High, University of Pennsylvania and the director of research, hematology division at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Data from the Web of Science (ISI, Philadelphia) show that Hot Papers are cited 50 to 100 times more often than the average paper of the same type and age.

R.W. Herzog, E.Y. Yang, L.B. Couto, J.N. Hagstrom, D. Elwell, P.A. Fields, M. Burton, D.A. Bellinger, M.S. Read, K.M. Brinkhous, G.M. Podsakoff, T.C. Nichols, G.J. Kurtzman, K.A. High, "Long-term correction of canine hemophilia B by gene transfer of blood coagulation factor IX mediated by adeno-associated viral vector," Nature Medicine, 5[1]: 56-63, January 1999. (Cited in 110 papers)

R.O. Snyder, C. Miao, L. Meuse, J. Tubb, B.A. Donahue, H.F. Lin, D.W....