HIV And AIDS

H.K. Deng, R. Liu, W. Ellmeier, S. Choe, D. Unutmaz, M. Burkhart, P. DiMarzio, S. Marmon, R.E. Sutton, C.M. Hill, C.B. Davis, S.C. Peiper, T.J. Schall, D.R. Littman, N.R. Landau, "Identification of a major co-receptor for primary isolates of HIV-1," Nature, 381:661-6, 1996. (Cited in more than 610 papers since publication) PRESS RUN: Ned Landau of the Aaron Diamond group raced to get confirmation of CCR5 as the HIV M-tropic coreceptor into publication, including a mad dash to an overnight ma

The Scientist Staff
Aug 16, 1998

H.K. Deng, R. Liu, W. Ellmeier, S. Choe, D. Unutmaz, M. Burkhart, P. DiMarzio, S. Marmon, R.E. Sutton, C.M. Hill, C.B. Davis, S.C. Peiper, T.J. Schall, D.R. Littman, N.R. Landau, "Identification of a major co-receptor for primary isolates of HIV-1," Nature, 381:661-6, 1996. (Cited in more than 610 papers since publication)


PRESS RUN: Ned Landau of the Aaron Diamond group raced to get confirmation of CCR5 as the HIV M-tropic coreceptor into publication, including a mad dash to an overnight mail office. Four other groups published similar results within weeks.
Comments by Ned Landau, staff investigator at the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, Rockefeller University, New York.

The progress of knowledge about how HIV enters the cells is akin to the evolutionary theory of punctuated equilibrium: long periods of little progress, followed by breakthroughs that trigger further discovery.

Ned Landau, staff investigator at the Aaron Diamond AIDS...

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