ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Hot Papers

E. Anders, N. Grevesse, "Abundances of the elements: meteoritic and solar," Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 53, 197-214, January 1989. Edward Anders (Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago): "Solar system abundances of the elements are fairly representative of the universe as a whole, and thus have two major uses in astrophysics and cosmo- chemistry: to inspire and test theories of nucleosynthesis, and to serve as a `baseline' for interpreting objects of non-standard composition, such

The Scientist Staff

E. Anders, N. Grevesse, "Abundances of the elements: meteoritic and solar," Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 53, 197-214, January 1989.

Edward Anders (Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago): "Solar system abundances of the elements are fairly representative of the universe as a whole, and thus have two major uses in astrophysics and cosmo- chemistry: to inspire and test theories of nucleosynthesis, and to serve as a `baseline' for interpreting objects of non-standard composition, such as planets, comets, peculiar stars, and cosmic rays. Every improvement in the baseline leads to further progress in these areas.

"The best data for light elements come mainly from analyses of the sun's photosphere and corona. Data for heavy elements come from primitive meteorites. Hoping to improve my previous effort (Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 46:2363-80, 1982), I invited the solar astronomer Nicolas Grevesse to join me. We critically reviewed the literature, and then...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT