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B. Vogelstein, E.R. Fearon, S.R. Hamilton, S.E. Kern, et al., “Genetic alterations during colorectal-tumor development,” The New England Journal of Medicine, 319,525-32, 1 September 1988. Bert Vogelstein (Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, Baltimore): “It is widely believed that cancer is the result of a series of genetic alterations. This paper is important because it lends substantial support to this belief with regard to one of the most common hu

The Scientist Staff

B. Vogelstein, E.R. Fearon, S.R. Hamilton, S.E. Kern, et al., “Genetic alterations during colorectal-tumor development,” The New England Journal of Medicine, 319,525-32, 1 September 1988. Bert Vogelstein (Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, Baltimore):

“It is widely believed that cancer is the result of a series of genetic alterations. This paper is important because it lends substantial support to this belief with regard to one of the most common human tumor types. The data in the paper suggest that colorectal neoplasia results from the mutational activation of an oncogne coupled with the loss of several genes that normally suppress tumorigenesis. The proposed model for colorectal cancers may also apply to other tumors in which such studies are more difficult to perform.

G.J. Dehmer, J.J. Pompa, E.K. van den Berg, E.J. Eichhorn, et al. “Reduction in the rate of early restenosis after coronary angioplasty by a diet supplemented...

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